Sports Medicine

Sports medicine focuses on prevention and treatment of injuries associated with athletic activities. We specialize in sports injuries from our experience with the Pittsburgh Steelers, Pittsburgh Penguins, Oklahoma City Thunder, and numerous collegiate and high school teams.

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Concussion Care

Concussions, previously known as mild traumatic brain injuries, are being increasingly recognized in sports. We have concussion care specialists with training under the experts who wrote the NFL guidelines in 2009.

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Customized Joint Replacement

Customized joint replacement is a surgical procedure in which certain parts of an arthritic or damaged joint are removed and replaced with a customized artificial joint, which is designed to move just like a healthy joint.

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Joint Replacement »

Total Hip Joint Replacement

You Don’t Have to Live with Joint Pain

Your joints are involved in almost every activity you do. Simple movements such as walking, bending, and turning require the use of your hip and knee joints. Normally, all parts of these joints work together and the joint moves easily without pain. But when the joint becomes diseased or injured, the resulting pain can severely limit your ability to move and work. Osteoarthritis, one of the most common forms of degenerative joint disease, affects an estimated 43 million people in the United States.1 Whether you are considering a total joint replacement, or are just beginning to explore available treatments, this website is for you. It will help you understand the causes of joint pain and treatment options. Most importantly, it will give you hope that you may be able to return to your favorite activities.

Once you’re through reading this website, be sure to ask your doctor any questions you may have. Gaining as much knowledge as possible will help you choose the best course of treatment to relieve your joint pain — and get you back into the swing of things.


References:

1. Arthritis Foundation website, Feb. 2006.